Electric Personal Transportation Has Taken Over Paris

Electric Personal Transportation Has Taken Over Paris

When electric scooters first hit the scene in major cities all across the world, it seemed like it was the next big thing in green transportation options. While the technology certainly has some major wins under its belt across the globe, it also didn’t take long for some major issues associated with the movement to present themselves. Among the major cities that have experienced these wins and issues, Paris is possibly the largest, with more than 15,000 electric scooters currently deployed in the city.

Electric Personal Transportation Has Taken Over Paris

From e-scooters to dockless bikes, Paris is slammed with these new, eco-friendly personal transportation options. However, it seems that there are so many bikes and scooters that they’ve started to cause issues throughout the city. In fact, Paris authorities have begun to issue fines to the residents and tourists who use the bikes. For example, riding an e-scooter on the sidewalk can land you a 135 euro fine.

The companies who provide the bikes and scooters have installed docking stations all over the city in spots that were previously used for street-side parking. That move was in response to a series of fines (35 euros) for each time a bike or scooter was found parked and blocking a sidewalk.

Electric Personal Transportation Has Taken Over Paris

The biggest issue facing the e-bike/scooter scene in Paris right now has to do with pedestrian right of way. While those who drive cars in Paris seem to have no problem at all giving pedestrians the right of way. However, those who ride e-scooters and bikes seem to think that they’re still pedestrians, and tend to cut straight across walking paths without ever thinking of slowing down. Part of what drives this issue is that renting a scooter or bike doesn’t require a license. Furthermore, many of the people who rent the bikes and scooters aren’t familiar with the traffic rules in Paris, creating a slight recipe for disaster.

The mayor of Paris is hopeful that the city will be able to work through the hiccups, because the city council is committed to getting as many cars off the roads as they can, hopefully cutting down on the congestion.